Orlando Magic Playbook: 5 ways the Orlando Magic offense changed after the All-Star Break

Jan 22, 2017; Orlando, FL, USA; Orlando Magic guard Elfrid Payton (4) drives to the basket against the Golden State Warriors during the second half at Amway Center. Golden State Warriors defeated the Orlando Magic 118-98. Mandatory Credit: Kim Klement-USA TODAY Sports
Jan 22, 2017; Orlando, FL, USA; Orlando Magic guard Elfrid Payton (4) drives to the basket against the Golden State Warriors during the second half at Amway Center. Golden State Warriors defeated the Orlando Magic 118-98. Mandatory Credit: Kim Klement-USA TODAY Sports /
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Terrence Ross, Orlando Magic, LeBron James, Cleveland Cavaliers
Mar 11, 2017; Orlando, FL, USA; Orlando Magic forward Terrence Ross (31) drives around Cleveland Cavaliers forward LeBron James (23) during the second half of an NBA basketball game at Amway Center. The Cavaliers won 116-104. Mandatory Credit: Reinhold Matay-USA TODAY Sports /

The Pace Factor

The Magic from the beginning of the season said they wanted to run and push the pace. Even with the team’s added size, the team wanted to get out and run and score in transition.

The idea was to use the team’s youth and athleticism to score easy points off the team’s strong defense. It made logical sense. But it was difficult to execute. The team’s shooting did not work out that way.

Obviously, the Magic increased their pace after the All-Star Break. It was more of an emphsasis, and having Aaron Gordon at power forward helped add another breaker in transition.

But there was a notable increase in fast-break points. That was an emphasis but was a bigger deal for the team after the break.

Before the All-Star Break, the Magic were 15th in the league with 13.3 fast-break points per game. After the All-Star Break, the Magic were seventh with 16.0 fast-break points per game. That is a significant raw increase.

Orlando was seventh with 15.7 fast-break points per 100 possessions after the All-Star Break after scoring 13.4 fast-break points per 100 possessions (14th in the league).

The Magic were always pretty good getting out in transition. This is a team that wanted to play this way. But they did so at a pretty average pace. When they increased their pace, the production increased too.

And it proved itself to be pretty effective.